2013 Matric Results of Herzlia ( United Hebrew day schools ,Cape Town ) by stephen Darori a 1980’s Alumni

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Dear Friends of Herzlia

After what seems like an interminable wait, we are delighted to announce the results of HERZLIA’s Matric Class of 2013 and to confirm that our pupils have once again excelled.

Please note that the National Senior Certificate (NSC) results are reported as follows:

  • There are no aggregates
  • The term ‘Matric Exemption” has been replaced by ‘Admission to Higher Education – PASS BACHELORS’
  • ‘Admission to Higher Education – PASS DIPLOMA’ indicates admissions to various diploma courses.

Following is a summary of the HERZLIA Matric results for 2013:

115 Matric candidates

100% pass rate – academically inclusive school

112 admissions to Higher Education – PASS BACHELORS (Matric Exemption) = (97.4%)

337 Subject Distinctions

2 candidates, Hannah Delit and Kezia Varkel, achieved 100% for Economics.

92 out of 115 candidates achieved one or more distinctions (80%)

1 candidate achieved 10 out of 10 distinctions

2 candidates achieved 9 out of 9 distinctions

2 candidates achieved 8 out of 8 distinctions

3 candidates achieved 7 out of 8 distinctions

2 candidates achieved 7 out of 7 distinctions

8 candidates achieved 6 distinctions

10 candidates achieved 5 distinctions

19 candidates achieved 4 distinctions

14 candidates achieved 3 distinctions

14 candidates achieved 2 distinctions

16 candidates achieved 1 distinction

DETAILS OF SUBJECT DISTINCTIONS

SUBJECT

DISTINCTIONS

NO. OF CANDIDATES

ACCOUNTING

9

13

ADVANCED PROGRAMME MATHEMATICS (APM)

3

5

AFRIKAANS

27

109

BUSINESS STUDIES

21

37

CAT

3

5

CONSUMER STUDIES

2

21

DANCE

1

1

DESIGN

4

8

DRAMATIC ARTS

23

30

ECONOMICS

17

27

ENGLISH

26

115

GEOGRAPHY

2

2

GREEK

1

1

HEBREW

4

7

HISTORY

34

56

IT

18

28

LIFE ORIENTATION

67

115

LIFE SCIENCES

18

58

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY

9

18

MATHEMATICS

17

96

MATHEMATICS PAPER 3

5

30

MUSIC

1

1

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

17

41

TOURISM

1

4

VISUAL ARTS

10

16

INDIVIDUAL ACHIEVEMENTS

10 out of 10 Distinctions

Saul Bloch

9 out of 9 Distinctions

Tamsin Kantor

Joshua Stein

8 out of 8 Distinctions

Cleo Candy

Jamie Froman

7 out of 8 Distinctions

Gary Finkelstein

Tao Klitzner

Kezia Varkel

7 out of 7 Distinctions

Richard Harrisberg

Georgia Saacks

6 Distinctions

Rael Alexander

Micaela Jacobson

Daniel Marcus

Ben Rubin

Nicole Saacks

Rachel Serraf

Levi Todes
Sarah Zinn

5 Distinctions
Lauri Epstein

Zachary Fleishman

Adam Kaliski

Aviva Lerer

Joshua Luck

Shane Robinson

Adam Rosendorff

Gabriella Tadmor

Kayo-Fay Tilley

Asher Woolff

4 Distinctions

Adam Alhadeff

Talia Anstey

Aidyn Breiter

Jesse Brooks

Nicholas Carson

Ricky Conn

Hannah Delit

Mira Friedman

Alison Goldstein

Jamie Goldstein

Ryan Jones

Lauren Kawalsky

Raphaella Lewis
Gadiel Margolin

Martine Sandler

Kayla Shaban

Tevya Shapiro

Lisa Stein

Aaron Weinstein

3 Distinctions

Jesse Copelyn

Jason Cumings

Adam Edelberg

Joshua Grant

Brandon Hall

Lauren Joffe

Ryan Kopping

Lebone Matshitse

Gina Reingold

Ariel Rubin

Miron Sarembock

Aiden Suskin

Carly Sutherland

Jasmine Waynik

2 Distinctions

Emily Bagg

Abigail Berkovitz

Mark Borland

Rachael Coxen

Steven Fine

Daniel Horwitz

Sasha Johns

Talia Kadish

Sean Kopman

Mika Marcuson

Simone Metz

Joshua Michelson

Matthew Miller

Daniel Sack

1 Distinction

Joseph Ackerman

Jenna Arnsmeyer

Joshua Berkman

Lauri Burke

Jarrod Burts

Hadar Gerassi

Zachary Helfrich

Jason Holzberg

Lindi Levin

Savannah Marescia

Brad Reingold

Gabbi Sank

Gabi Slotow

Sivana Stevenson

Chanan Suiza

Alexa Venter

Faye Zachariadi

I am delighted with these results: they are outstanding!

It is clear that right across the spectrum of these results, the class of 2013 and their teachers have worked extremely hard, tirelessly in fact, to achieve so brilliantly.  This would not be possible without the excellent educational foundation that was laid from Pre-Primary level upwards.

Congratulations and thanks to all of the teachers involved.

Mazeltov to the Matrics of 2013 and their parents.  They have definitely done HERZLIA and their community proud.

MARIANNE MARKSPRINCIPAL, HERZLIA HIGH SCHOOL

MH Goldschmidt Avenue, Highlands Estate, Cape Town, 8001
PO Box 3508, Cape Town, 8000
Tel: +27 21 464 3300  Fax: +27 21 461 8834
Email: mmarks@herzlia.comWeb: www.herzlia.com

GEOFF COHENDirector of EducationMH Goldschmidt Avenue, Highlands Estate, Cape Town, 8001
PO Box 3508, Cape Town, 8000
Tel: +27 21 464 3304  Fax: +27 21 461 8647Email: mailto:geoffc@herzlia.com Web: www.herzlia.com

 

Mandela’s Relations with the Jews

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Nelson Mandela, July 4 1993.

Nelson Mandela, July 4 1993. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Barry Streek (on right) shaking hands...

English: Barry Streek (on right) shaking hands with then president Nelson Mandela. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: A USSR stamp, 70th Birth Anniversary ...

English: A USSR stamp, 70th Birth Anniversary of Nelson Mandela. Date of issue: 18th July 1988. Designer: B. Ilyukhin. Michel catalogue number: 5853. 10 K. multicoloured. Portrait of Nelson Mandela (fighter for freedom of Africa). Русский: Марка СССР Н. Мандела (1988, ЦФА №5971). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

President Bill Clinton with Nelson Mandela, Ju...

President Bill Clinton with Nelson Mandela, July 4 1993. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela (Photo credit: Festival Karsh Ottawa)

Português: Brasília - O presidente da África d...

Português: Brasília – O presidente da África do Sul, Nelson Mandela, é recebido na capital federal. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Young Nelson Mandela. This photo date...

English: Young Nelson Mandela. This photo dates from 1937. South Africa protect the copyright of photographs for 50 years from their first publication. See . Since this image would have been PD in South Africa in 1996, when the URAA took effect, this image is PD in the U.S. Image source: http://www.anc.org.za/people/mandela/index.html (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mandela’s Relations with the Jews

Date Posted: 2013-12-06 17:32:51

 

nelson mandela and the jews
The late philanthropist Mendel Kaplan showing late South Africa President Nelson Mandela around the South African Jewish Museum, which was opened by Mandela in 2000. (Shawn Benjamin/Ark Images)

In the early 1940s, at a time when it was virtually impossible for a South African of color to secure a professional apprenticeship, the Jewish law firm Witkin, Sidelsky and Eidelman gave a young black man a job as a clerk.

It was among the first encounters in what would become a lifelong relationship between Nelson Mandela and South Africa’s tiny Jewish community, impacting the statesman’s life at several defining moments — from his arrival in Johannesburg from the rural Transkei region as a young man to his years of struggle, imprisonment and ascension to the presidency.

Mandela, who died Thursday at 95, wrote of the early job in his autobiography, “Long Walk to Freedom,” and acknowledged the disproportionate role that Jews played in the struggle against apartheid. Lazer Sidelsky, one of the firm’s partners, treated him with “enormous kindness” and was among the first whites to treat him with respect.
“I have found Jews to be more broad-minded than most whites on issues of race and politics, perhaps because they themselves have historically been victims of prejudice,” Mandela wrote.

South Africa’s Jews remembered Mandela, the country’s first democratically elected president, as a close friend, one with deep ties to prominent community figures and a partner in the decades-long effort to end apartheid.

“I was extremely privileged to lead the community during his presidency,” said Mervyn Smith, who was chairman and later president of the South African Jewish Board of Deputies, the community’s representative body. “We met with him on many occasions and the talk was direct and open.”

For Mandela, who rose to prominence as a leading opponent of the discriminatory racial regime known as apartheid, Jews were vital allies. Jewish lawyers represented him in multiple trials, and Jewish activists and political figures played leading roles in the fight.

But Mandela’s ties to prominent South African Jews were personal as well as political. The former president’s second marriage, to Winnie Madikizela in 1958, took place at the home of Ray Harmel, a Jewish anti-apartheid activist. Harmel made Winnie’s wedding dress at Mandela’s request, according to David Saks’ history “Jewish Memories of Mandela.”

When Mandela married again, in 1998, he invited Chief Rabbi Cyril Harris to offer a private blessing on the nuptials that were scheduled to take place on Shabbat.
“After a warm exchange of greetings, Rabbi Cyril spoke quietly to them and blessed them,” Cyril’s wife, Ann, wrote later. “They stood through the blessing holding hands and with eyes closed. One could almost imagine the huppah.”

nelson mandela and the jews
Nelson Mandela salutes the crowd at the Green and Sea Point Hebrew Congregation in Cape Town on a visit shortly after being elected South Africa’s president in 1994. Joining Mandela, from left, are Rabbi Jack Steinhorn; Israel’s ambassador to South Africa, Alon Liel; Chief Rabbi Cyril Harris; and Mervyn Smith, chairman of the South African Jewish Board of Deputies. (SA Rochlin Archives, SAJBD)

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela was born in 1918 in the village of Mvezo, in the southeastern part of the country. As a young lawyer he was active in the African National Congress, which was beginning to challenge laws it considered unjust and discriminatory.

In the 1950s, Mandela was tried for treason. He was acquitted with the help of a defense team led by Israel Maisels. Several years later, when he was accused of attempting to overthrow the apartheid regime during the Rivonia Trial, Mandela was defended by several Jewish lawyers.

Mandela was found guilty and sentenced to life in prison in 1964. He served most of his sentence on Robben Island, a former leper colony off the coast of Cape Town. The legendary, feisty Jewish parliamentarian Helen Suzman visited him there. Another prison visitor was the journalist Benjamin Pogrund, who worked frequently with Mandela in the 1960s.

In a 1986 visit at Pollsmoor Prison, Pogrund informed Mandela that his son would shortly be celebrating his bar mitzvah. Afterward, the boy received a personal note from the future president.

“From a man serving a life sentence — and at that stage with no idea when he might be released — it was a kind and thoughtful action for a youngster he had not even met,” Pogrund said, according to Saks.

Mandela was released after 27 years, in February 1990. Four years later he was elected president. Among his appointees was Arthur Chaskalson, a member of his defense team during the Rivonia Trial, as the first president of the new Constitutional Court; he later became chief justice.

Mandela’s deep ties to the Jewish community continued during his political career. On the first Shabbat after his election, he visited the Marais Road synagogue in Sea Point.
“Almost his first celebration was with the Jewish community,” Smith told JTA.

In 1994, at the opening of an exhibition on Anne Frank, Mandela recounted how a handwritten version of her diary had inspired him and fellow prisoners on Robben Island.

nelson mandela and the jews
Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat meeting with Nelson Mandela in an undated photo. (Palestinian Authority via Getty Images)

On Israel, Mandela’s relationship with the Jewish community was not free of controversy. His African National Congress cultivated close ties with the Palestine Liberation Organization and Mandela warmly embraced its leader, Yasser Arafat.

Confronted with Jewish protests, Mandela was dismissive, insisting that his relations with other countries would be determined by their attitudes toward the liberation movement.

“If the truth alienates the powerful Jewish community in South Africa, that’s too bad,” Mandela was reported to have said, according to Gideon Shimoni, author of “Community and Conscience: The Jews in Apartheid South Africa.”

Shimoni also recounts a 1990 encounter at the University of the Witwatersrand with a Jewish student.

“Your enemies are not my enemies,” Mandela said.

According to Saks, Mandela stressed his respect for Israel’s right to exist even as he defended his relationships with Palestinian leaders. It was perhaps illustrative of his policy of inclusivity that Mandela accepted an honorary doctorate from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in 1997 when many in his party remained opposed to any ties with Israel.

On a visit to Israel in 1999, Mandela invited Harris to join him.

“He made us proud to be South Africans,” Smith said. “His presence at any communal occasion was electrifying. The Jewish community’s pride in its relationship with President Mandela will be forever enduring.”

via jta.org